D Pannekoeken

There’s an old movie, Cool Hand Luke, where Paul Newman says repeatedly, “What we have here is a failure to communicate.”

I had a failure to communicate.   I asked Kelli to make some little peach pannekoeken but didn’t give her directions.  So they didn’t turn out as I expected.

We’ve made little pannekoeken for desserts a lot.  You make them in a jumbo muffin pan, pour the batter in a hot pan with a little butter and bake them for ten minutes or so.  You have the cutest little dessert cups.  Then you load your cups with fruit, ice cream, and whipped cream- whatever.

See how to make little pannekoeken desserts (with video). 

Kelli added peach pie filling to the batter before baking.  Darned, if they didn’t turn out really good.  The batter baked around the filling.  It was more like a German Pancake with the fruit baked into the filling.  We put some syrup and caramel whipped cream on them and we had great little desserts.  They would have worked fine for breakfast.

So I thanked her for her discovery.

D MiniStraw

Adding fruit before or after?

If you want to make a traditional pannekoeken dessert, bake the pannekoeken and add the fruit to the baked cups topped with whipped cream or a syrup.

If you want little German pancakes with the fruit baked into the batter, add the fruit or filling before heading to the oven.  I think that will work best with a pie filling.

For me, if it’s fresh fruit, I’m going to add the fruit after.  I’ll sprinkle a little sugar on the fruit and assemble the desserts just before serving.

If I’m going to use pastry filling or pie filling, I’ll add that before baking, bake them, and serve them hot from the oven with syrup and whipped cream.

D SundaeBy the way, you can make great little sundaes with these mini pannekoeken.  The image of the right is of a hot fudge sundae in a chocolate pannekoeken.