January 19, 2019

PHOTO ESSAY

Photos by Scot Proctor and text by Mariah Proctor.

The past is not easy to preserve or to acknowledge in the bustle of the present. We often forget the innovation and sacrifice that it cost generations past to bring us somewhere new that we now esteem as ordinary. Yet one town in central Utah has come together to prove that preserving our past, that link to our very identity, is essential to where we’re meant to progress from here.

Spring City is at the geographical heart of Utah and that is at it should be since this town, whose nuclear layout stands as rare and preserved example of the typical pioneer settlement, represents what was in the hearts of the inhabitants of these turn-of-the-century Mormon communities.

Unlike the farm country of the Midwest that featured homesteads that stood lonely and isolated in the middle of their land miles apart, Mormon settlements were modeled after the prophet Joseph’s ‘plat of the city Zion.’

The homes were neatly arranged around a nucleus with larger plots of farmland located outside of the town itself.

They strove to nurture a feeling of community and support one for another, and though the original inhabitants have long since passed on, that desire for unity remains infused in the bubbling spring that gave Spring City its name, in the over 60 restored pioneer-era homes that remain proudly standing, and in the hearts of the citizens themselves.